Countering Extremism 3. Victims

In this article we look at the inconsistent way the report refers to different races in terms of victims and perpetrators of ‘hateful extremism’, hate crime and terrorism. The author’s approach is the norm for our society. We review the impact of this on the safety and wellbeing of White people.


Note: While the review by the Commission for Countering Extremism has ‘hateful extremism’ as its primary focus, the authors also refer to hate crime and terrorism within the report, and suggest an overlap and connection between all three.

We do the same in this article.

A pdf of the Operating with Impunity Hateful extremism: The need for a legal framework review in full is available at the end of this page together with links to our other articles in this series.


Victims and Perpetrators Identified in the Report

VICTIMS The report refers to Jews, to Asians, to Muslims and to Blacks as victims of ‘hateful extremism’. There is only one reference to Whites as victims, and that is ‘White race mixers’. Other than this example, where Whites and victim status are linked this is either presented as a conspiracy theory or is linked to hostility and aggression on the part of Whites and is not given any credence. There are no references to Christians in the report.

Images from the report posted below, provide examples. The first references hate crimes against Muslims and Jews, the second refers to the false claims of ‘White genocide’:

Chapter 2 The Growing Challenge of Hateful Extremism: A Snapshot
Chapter 1. Executive Summary: Key Findings and Recommendations Operating with Impunity

PERPETRATORS With regard to perpetrators the ONLY race to be referred to throughout the report is the White race. At one point the report quotes statistical data for two groups. The first group is named based on their religion (British Muslims) the second based on their race (non-Muslim White Britons). See images below:

Chapter 2 The Growing Challenge of Hateful Extremism: A Snapshot

Given that the mainstream narrative outlined in our earlier article creates a climate conducive to hate and violence against Whites, this is of concern. It also suggests that the race of the twenty two victims of the Manchester bombing, all of whom were White, is seen as immaterial.

The subtle message conveyed is White can never be the victims, only the perpetrators.


Victims of Terrorism at Manchester Arena

The Commission for Counter Extremism was set up in 2017 in response to the Manchester Arena bomb attack, in which twenty two adults and children were killed, so it can be expected that this act of terrorism plays a central part of its thinking.

Photos and names of the twenty two victims have been posted below. The BBC website gives further details of each of the victims of the terrorist attack.

Young or older, male or female, all the victims have two things in common. They were all murdered in an Islamist terror attack and they were all White. Why is it so difficult to report that simple truth, when, if the perpetrator had been White and the victims Jewish, Black, Asian or Arab it would be the primary focus of the news story?


Impact of ‘Whites Cannot be Victims, Only Perpetrators’

As a result of the narrative ‘Whites are never victims, only perpetrators’ it is immeasurably harder to protect White people’s safety. Had an equivalent to the Manchester bombing been planned for a Jewish venue, a Muslim venue, a place where non Whites congregate, no one would have worried about reporting a suspicious White person for fear of being called racist. Yet that was exactly what happened in Manchester arena and twenty two White people died.

Dawn Waddy and her daughter were suspicious of a women at the arena. “My daughter got upset about it and she went to security and they basically told her “how would you like it is someone accused you of this...” The video of Dawn describing her experince and a link to the article is posted below:

This was reported at the time but had little impact and received little attention. Yet it demonstrates how a White person being suspicious of a non White person is viewed.


A second example has come to light more recently through the Manchester Arena Inquiry. The security guard says he failed to follow his instincts because he was scared of being wrong and being branded a racist and “if I got it wrong and [I] would have got into trouble”.

Can anyone put their hands on their heart and say he would not have got into trouble if he, as a White man, had reported his suspicions of a Brown Muslim, and his suspicions had turned out to be unwarranted. Remember no one can know before hand whether their suspicion is valid or not.

Twenty two innocent White people died at Manchester Arena. Had society not demonised legitimate suspicion by White people they may still be alive today. Ask yourself, are people more or less likely to report suspicions about non White people today as compared to four years ago? If ‘hateful extremism’ becomes a legally recognised crime will that help people to come forward with worries, or hinder that.


The failure to protect the victims of the Manchester Arena did not stop even after the terrorist attack. Salman Abedi detonated a bomb packed with 3,000 nuts and bolts at 22:31 BST on 22 May 2017. Fire crews were eventually sent to the arena at 00.22 BST on 23 May 2017. They arrived two-hours after the explosion.

Maybe this two-hour delay in providing vital services to the injured and dying would have happened if other races had been at the forefront of the attack, we can never be sure. What we can be sure of is that if that was the case, it would have been presented as evidence of ‘systemic racism’ by the Fire Service and racism by those involved. As it was the victims were White, so it hardly created ripples let alone waves.


Other articles in this series:


Commission for Countering Extremism legal review. A purportedly ‘independent’ review examining whether existing legislation adequately deals with hateful extremism

Pdf of the review:

Operating with Impunity: Hateful extremism (publishing.service.gov.uk)

Published 2 March 2021